Verfasst von: Dr. Who | 11.3.14

745 | Snowden aktuell

‚US Constitution was being violated on massive scale‘ – Snowden

Speaking via video link, former NSA contractor Edward Snowden told a packed house at the South by Southwest Interactive Festival to fight against mass surveillance. "The NSA, the sort of global mass surveillance that’s occurring in all of these countries, not just the U.S. and it’s important to remember that this is a global issue, they are setting fire to the future of the internet and the people who are in this room now, you guys are all the firefighters."

"If data is being clandestinely acquired, and the public doesn’t have any way to review it, and it’s not legislatively authorized, it’s not reviewed by the courts, it’s not consonant with our Constitution, that’s a problem."

Fugitive US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden urged the technology community on Monday to improve protections for internet users against mass surveillance by governments and other data breaches. "There’s a policy response that needs to occur, but there’s also a technical response that needs to occur," he said, speaking by live videolink to a packed hall in Austin, Texas.

Living under temporary asylum in Russia, Snowden is a former contractor for the National Security Agency (NSA) who released thousands of classified documents last year, exposing US mass collection of telephone metadata and internet monitoring by the intelligence agency.

The revelations of spying programmes by the United States and other countries have sparked continuing security and diplomatic rows.

The Snowden case has galvanized technology companies seeking to distance themselves from NSA surveillance, with some industry leaders raising security and encryption standards.

Snowden addressed a session during South by Southwest Interactive, one of the world’s leading online and multimedia industry and culture events.

"The people who are in the room in Austin right now – they’re the folks who can really fix things, who can enforce our rights through technical standards," he said.

Snowden’s video feed often froze while he continued speaking, and the audio was tinny and sometimes garbled.

He sat in front of a giant replica of the US Constitution’s preamble, with the famous opening words "We, the people," in large letters.

Ben Wizner, his US attorney and director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech, Privacy and Technology Project, who moderated the conference, said that Snowden was connected through seven proxy servers, apparently in an effort to conceal his location in Russia.

Even before Snowden spoke, privacy and data security was the dominant topic at South by Southwest, which opened Friday and continues through Sunday, including film and music festivals.

Major internet companies, whose business models depend on mining users‘ data for targeted advertising, have re-emphasized privacy and security since last year.

Steven Coufal, 25, a marketing specialist who attended Monday’s conference, said Snowden’s appearance would fuel further debate: "That was great."

Snowden, 30, who faces criminal prosecution if he returns to the United States, denied that his leaks had undermined national security.

"We’ve actually had tremendous intelligence failures because we’re monitoring the internet … everybody’s communications instead of suspects‘ communications. And that lack of focus has caused us to miss leads that we should have had," he said.

Questioning those policies is "improving our national security," Snowden said.

He called for stronger oversight of intelligence gathering and accused Congress of failing in that role.

"We have an oversight model that could work," Snowden said.

"The problem is when your overseers aren’t interested in oversight, when we’ve got Senate intelligence committees, House intelligence committees, that are cheerleading for the NSA instead of holding them to account."

ACLU privacy researcher Christopher Soghoian, who participated in the Snowden conference, noted that many Americans disagree with Snowden’s decision to leak classified information.

"Let me be clear about one really important thing: His disclosures have improved Internet security," Soghoian said, drawing applause from the crowd. "And the security improvements we’ve gotten haven’t just protected us from bulk government surveillance. They’ve protected us from hackers at Starbucks who are monitoring our wi-fi connections. They’ve protected us from stalkers and identity thieves and common criminals."

Wizner asked Snowden, who has been unable to leave Russia, if the impact of his revelations was worth the price he has paid. "Would I do this again? The answer is absolutely, yes," Snowden replied.

"Regardless of what happens to me, this is something we had a right to know. I took an oath to support and defend the Constitution, and I felt that the Constitution was violated on a massive scale."

Voice of Russia, dpa, Reuters

Fugitive intelligence leaker Edward Snowden voiced fears that US "government officials want to kill me", in a TV interview to be broadcast in Germany Sunday. The comment comes just days after Snowden’s Russian lawyer Anatoly Kucherena said the American feared for his life, following a report by US website BuzzFeed of explicit threats against him from unnamed Pentagon and National Security Agency (NSA) officials.

Snowden also told the German broadcaster: "These people, and they are government officials, have said they would love to put a bullet in my head or poison me when I come out of the supermarket, and then watch as I die in the shower."

The translated Snowden quotes were released by German public television chain ARD, as part of a longer interview shot secretly in Moscow.

In a BuzzFeed article posted online last week and entitled "American spies want Edward Snowden dead", a Pentagon official is quoted as saying: "I would love to put a bullet in his head."

"In a world where I would not be restricted from killing an American, I personally would go and kill him myself," a current NSA analyst was further quoted as saying.

One unnamed army officer told BuzzFeed that Snowden could be "poked" on his way home from buying groceries by a passerby who is actually a US agent.

Snowden "thinks nothing of it at the time (and soon) starts to feel a little woozy," the US intelligence officer is quoted as saying. "And the next thing you know he dies in the shower."

NSA carried out industrial intelligence for US – Snowden

The US National Security Agency (NSA) sometimes uses data it collects for economic purposes, intelligence leaker Edward Snowden reveals in an extract of an interview with a German television chain. "If there is information, for example on Siemens, which is in the national interest, but has nothing to do with national security, they will still use this information," said Snowden, according to the German translation of the interview on public television ARD.

The interview was carried out by a journalist for NDR, a regional chain belonging to the broadcaster that has analysed secret documents that Snowden leaked to journalists.

Under top secrecy, the chain this week in Moscow filmed the first interview with Snowden since he left Hong Kong in 2013 to seek refuge in Russia.

On its website, NDR said that Snowden assured he was no longer in possession of any confidential documents, as they had all been handed out to handpicked journalists.

The former NSA contractor said he no longer wants to, or is able to, take part in any future revelations.

Other than the consequences of his revelations about NSA surveillance programs, Snowden will also address "his personal path" to leaking the information.

On Thursday, in a question-and-answer session on the "Free Snowden" website, Snowden ruled out returning to the United States, where he said there was no chance of a free trial.

US Attorney General Eric Holder has said he was unlikely to consider clemency for Snowden.

Snowden won’t return to US without amnesty – legal adviser

Edward Snowden would be willing to enter talks with US Attorney General Eric Holder to negotiate his return to the United States but not without a guarantee of amnesty, his legal adviser said on Sunday.

Jesselyn Radack said she was glad Holder indicated last week he would talk to lawyers for the former US spy agency contractor to negotiate his return from Moscow, but that Snowden would need better protection.

"It’s a little disheartening that he (Holder) seemed to take clemency and amnesty off the table, which are two of the negotiating points," said Radack, who was interviewed via satellite from Moscow by NBC’s "Meet the Press".

"But again, none of us have been contacted yet about restarting negotiations," the legal adviser said.

Holder said in an interview on MSNBC on Thursday the United States would not consider the idea of amnesty for Snowden "where we say, no harm, no foul".

Radack, who is the director of national security and human rights at the Government Accountability Project – a whistleblowers‘ organization – said Snowden has already suffered because his US passport revoked has been revoked.

"He has been punished quite a bit already and while we are glad to dialogue and negotiate, he is not going to come back and face an espionage prosecution," she said.

Snowden himself on Thursday discussed what conditions would be necessary if he were to return to theUnited States on a website called "Free Snowden".

"Returning to the US, I think, is the best resolution for the government, the public, and myself, but it’s unfortunately not possible in the face of current whistleblower protection laws, which through a failure in law did not cover national security contractors like myself," Snowden wrote.

Michael Chertoff, former secretary of homeland security under President George W. Bush, who appeared after Radack on "Meet the Press," said Snowden could get a fair trial if he returns to the country but was unlikely to be granted amnesty.

"If he decides he wants to tell the US government everything he stole he may be able to bargain for some kind of reduced sentence," he said, adding Snowden was potentially facing a life sentence, or 25-30 years in jail.

Chertoff added that the government has "done deals in the past with spies" – comparing Snowden toRobert Hanssen, a former FBI agent who spied for Soviet and Russian intelligence services from 1979 to 2001.

Radack said allegations Snowden was a spy were unsubstantiated and the result of a smear campaign by the government.

"Mr. Snowden publicly chatted with the US this week to deny being a spy but if people don’t want to take my word for it or Mr. Snowden’s word for it, you can ask the FBI, which decided and still believes he acted alone," she said.

First interview while in Russia: Snowden talks to German NDR – reports

Former employee of US special services Edward Snowden, who revealed thousands of secret documents, has given his first interview since coming to Russia, the website of the German TV company NDR says.

The site says that Snowden, in strict secrecy, talked with journalist Hubert Seipel.

During the interview, Snowden particularly, said that the US National Security Agency also engages in industrial espionage. If there is information about, for example, the Siemens company, which is not linked with issues of national security, NSA would also use it, Snowden said.

Edward Snowden also said that at present, he has no confidential documents on his hands. He has already handed everythinhg he posessed over to journalists.

The full version of Snowden’s interview will be broadcasted by the NDR TV channel on Sunday at 22:00 GMT.

In July 2013, Edward Snowden gave several secret materials concerning the NSA’s secret surveillance activities to reportets from The Washington Post and The Guardian newspapers. The NSA claims that up to 20,000 secret documents may have come into journalists‘ hands.

After handing over the papers, he flew to Hong Kong. From July 23, 2013, Snowden stayed in the transit zone at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport until August when the Russian government granted him temporary asylum for one year.

Read more:

Republicans urge lawmakers to end surveillance of Americans‘ phone records

Snowden himself to decide on temporary asylum extension in Russia – lawyer

US gov’t abuse of human rights is the real crime, not Snowden – interview

Voice of Russia, RIA Novosti, Reuters, dpa

Fugitive US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden urged the technology community on Monday to improve protections for internet users against mass surveillance by governments and other data breaches. "There’s a policy response that needs to occur, but there’s also a technical response that needs to occur," he said, speaking by live videolink to a packed hall in Austin, Texas.

Living under temporary asylum in Russia, Snowden is a former contractor for the National Security Agency (NSA) who released thousands of classified documents last year, exposing US mass collection of telephone metadata and internet monitoring by the intelligence agency.

The revelations of spying programmes by the United States and other countries have sparked continuing security and diplomatic rows.

The Snowden case has galvanized technology companies seeking to distance themselves from NSA surveillance, with some industry leaders raising security and encryption standards.

Snowden addressed a session during South by Southwest Interactive, one of the world’s leading online and multimedia industry and culture events.

"The people who are in the room in Austin right now – they’re the folks who can really fix things, who can enforce our rights through technical standards," he said.

Snowden’s video feed often froze while he continued speaking, and the audio was tinny and sometimes garbled.

He sat in front of a giant replica of the US Constitution’s preamble, with the famous opening words "We, the people," in large letters.

Ben Wizner, his US attorney and director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech, Privacy and Technology Project, who moderated the conference, said that Snowden was connected through seven proxy servers, apparently in an effort to conceal his location in Russia.

Even before Snowden spoke, privacy and data security was the dominant topic at South by Southwest, which opened Friday and continues through Sunday, including film and music festivals.

Major internet companies, whose business models depend on mining users‘ data for targeted advertising, have re-emphasized privacy and security since last year.

Steven Coufal, 25, a marketing specialist who attended Monday’s conference, said Snowden’s appearance would fuel further debate: "That was great."

Snowden, 30, who faces criminal prosecution if he returns to the United States, denied that his leaks had undermined national security.

"We’ve actually had tremendous intelligence failures because we’re monitoring the internet … everybody’s communications instead of suspects‘ communications. And that lack of focus has caused us to miss leads that we should have had," he said.

Questioning those policies is "improving our national security," Snowden said.

He called for stronger oversight of intelligence gathering and accused Congress of failing in that role.

"We have an oversight model that could work," Snowden said.

"The problem is when your overseers aren’t interested in oversight, when we’ve got Senate intelligence committees, House intelligence committees, that are cheerleading for the NSA instead of holding them to account."

ACLU privacy researcher Christopher Soghoian, who participated in the Snowden conference, noted that many Americans disagree with Snowden’s decision to leak classified information.

"Let me be clear about one really important thing: His disclosures have improved Internet security," Soghoian said, drawing applause from the crowd. "And the security improvements we’ve gotten haven’t just protected us from bulk government surveillance. They’ve protected us from hackers at Starbucks who are monitoring our wi-fi connections. They’ve protected us from stalkers and identity thieves and common criminals."

Wizner asked Snowden, who has been unable to leave Russia, if the impact of his revelations was worth the price he has paid. "Would I do this again? The answer is absolutely, yes," Snowden replied.

"Regardless of what happens to me, this is something we had a right to know. I took an oath to support and defend the Constitution, and I felt that the Constitution was violated on a massive scale."

Voice of Russia, dpa, Reuters

Fugitive intelligence leaker Edward Snowden voiced fears that US "government officials want to kill me", in a TV interview to be broadcast in Germany Sunday. The comment comes just days after Snowden’s Russian lawyer Anatoly Kucherena said the American feared for his life, following a report by US website BuzzFeed of explicit threats against him from unnamed Pentagon and National Security Agency (NSA) officials.

Snowden also told the German broadcaster: "These people, and they are government officials, have said they would love to put a bullet in my head or poison me when I come out of the supermarket, and then watch as I die in the shower."

The translated Snowden quotes were released by German public television chain ARD, as part of a longer interview shot secretly in Moscow.

In a BuzzFeed article posted online last week and entitled "American spies want Edward Snowden dead", a Pentagon official is quoted as saying: "I would love to put a bullet in his head."

"In a world where I would not be restricted from killing an American, I personally would go and kill him myself," a current NSA analyst was further quoted as saying.

One unnamed army officer told BuzzFeed that Snowden could be "poked" on his way home from buying groceries by a passerby who is actually a US agent.

Snowden "thinks nothing of it at the time (and soon) starts to feel a little woozy," the US intelligence officer is quoted as saying. "And the next thing you know he dies in the shower."

NSA carried out industrial intelligence for US – Snowden

The US National Security Agency (NSA) sometimes uses data it collects for economic purposes, intelligence leaker Edward Snowden reveals in an extract of an interview with a German television chain. "If there is information, for example on Siemens, which is in the national interest, but has nothing to do with national security, they will still use this information," said Snowden, according to the German translation of the interview on public television ARD.

The interview was carried out by a journalist for NDR, a regional chain belonging to the broadcaster that has analysed secret documents that Snowden leaked to journalists.

Under top secrecy, the chain this week in Moscow filmed the first interview with Snowden since he left Hong Kong in 2013 to seek refuge in Russia.

On its website, NDR said that Snowden assured he was no longer in possession of any confidential documents, as they had all been handed out to handpicked journalists.

The former NSA contractor said he no longer wants to, or is able to, take part in any future revelations.

Other than the consequences of his revelations about NSA surveillance programs, Snowden will also address "his personal path" to leaking the information.

On Thursday, in a question-and-answer session on the "Free Snowden" website, Snowden ruled out returning to the United States, where he said there was no chance of a free trial.

US Attorney General Eric Holder has said he was unlikely to consider clemency for Snowden.

Snowden won’t return to US without amnesty – legal adviser

Edward Snowden would be willing to enter talks with US Attorney General Eric Holder to negotiate his return to the United States but not without a guarantee of amnesty, his legal adviser said on Sunday.

Jesselyn Radack said she was glad Holder indicated last week he would talk to lawyers for the former US spy agency contractor to negotiate his return from Moscow, but that Snowden would need better protection.

"It’s a little disheartening that he (Holder) seemed to take clemency and amnesty off the table, which are two of the negotiating points," said Radack, who was interviewed via satellite from Moscow by NBC’s "Meet the Press".

"But again, none of us have been contacted yet about restarting negotiations," the legal adviser said.

Holder said in an interview on MSNBC on Thursday the United States would not consider the idea of amnesty for Snowden "where we say, no harm, no foul".

Radack, who is the director of national security and human rights at the Government Accountability Project – a whistleblowers‘ organization – said Snowden has already suffered because his US passport revoked has been revoked.

"He has been punished quite a bit already and while we are glad to dialogue and negotiate, he is not going to come back and face an espionage prosecution," she said.

Snowden himself on Thursday discussed what conditions would be necessary if he were to return to theUnited States on a website called "Free Snowden".

"Returning to the US, I think, is the best resolution for the government, the public, and myself, but it’s unfortunately not possible in the face of current whistleblower protection laws, which through a failure in law did not cover national security contractors like myself," Snowden wrote.

Michael Chertoff, former secretary of homeland security under President George W. Bush, who appeared after Radack on "Meet the Press," said Snowden could get a fair trial if he returns to the country but was unlikely to be granted amnesty.

"If he decides he wants to tell the US government everything he stole he may be able to bargain for some kind of reduced sentence," he said, adding Snowden was potentially facing a life sentence, or 25-30 years in jail.

Chertoff added that the government has "done deals in the past with spies" – comparing Snowden toRobert Hanssen, a former FBI agent who spied for Soviet and Russian intelligence services from 1979 to 2001.

Radack said allegations Snowden was a spy were unsubstantiated and the result of a smear campaign by the government.

"Mr. Snowden publicly chatted with the US this week to deny being a spy but if people don’t want to take my word for it or Mr. Snowden’s word for it, you can ask the FBI, which decided and still believes he acted alone," she said.

First interview while in Russia: Snowden talks to German NDR – reports

Former employee of US special services Edward Snowden, who revealed thousands of secret documents, has given his first interview since coming to Russia, the website of the German TV company NDR says.

The site says that Snowden, in strict secrecy, talked with journalist Hubert Seipel.

During the interview, Snowden particularly, said that the US National Security Agency also engages in industrial espionage. If there is information about, for example, the Siemens company, which is not linked with issues of national security, NSA would also use it, Snowden said.

Edward Snowden also said that at present, he has no confidential documents on his hands. He has already handed everythinhg he posessed over to journalists.

The full version of Snowden’s interview will be broadcasted by the NDR TV channel on Sunday at 22:00 GMT.

In July 2013, Edward Snowden gave several secret materials concerning the NSA’s secret surveillance activities to reportets from The Washington Post and The Guardian newspapers. The NSA claims that up to 20,000 secret documents may have come into journalists‘ hands.

After handing over the papers, he flew to Hong Kong. From July 23, 2013, Snowden stayed in the transit zone at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport until August when the Russian government granted him temporary asylum for one year.

Read more:

Republicans urge lawmakers to end surveillance of Americans‘ phone records

Snowden himself to decide on temporary asylum extension in Russia – lawyer

US gov’t abuse of human rights is the real crime, not Snowden – interview

Voice of Russia, RIA Novosti, Reuters, dpa

Fugitive US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden urged the technology community on Monday to improve protections for internet users against mass surveillance by governments and other data breaches. "There’s a policy response that needs to occur, but there’s also a technical response that needs to occur," he said, speaking by live videolink to a packed hall in Austin, Texas.

Living under temporary asylum in Russia, Snowden is a former contractor for the National Security Agency (NSA) who released thousands of classified documents last year, exposing US mass collection of telephone metadata and internet monitoring by the intelligence agency.

The revelations of spying programmes by the United States and other countries have sparked continuing security and diplomatic rows.

The Snowden case has galvanized technology companies seeking to distance themselves from NSA surveillance, with some industry leaders raising security and encryption standards.

Snowden addressed a session during South by Southwest Interactive, one of the world’s leading online and multimedia industry and culture events.

"The people who are in the room in Austin right now – they’re the folks who can really fix things, who can enforce our rights through technical standards," he said.

Snowden’s video feed often froze while he continued speaking, and the audio was tinny and sometimes garbled.

He sat in front of a giant replica of the US Constitution’s preamble, with the famous opening words "We, the people," in large letters.

Ben Wizner, his US attorney and director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech, Privacy and Technology Project, who moderated the conference, said that Snowden was connected through seven proxy servers, apparently in an effort to conceal his location in Russia.

Even before Snowden spoke, privacy and data security was the dominant topic at South by Southwest, which opened Friday and continues through Sunday, including film and music festivals.

Major internet companies, whose business models depend on mining users‘ data for targeted advertising, have re-emphasized privacy and security since last year.

Steven Coufal, 25, a marketing specialist who attended Monday’s conference, said Snowden’s appearance would fuel further debate: "That was great."

Snowden, 30, who faces criminal prosecution if he returns to the United States, denied that his leaks had undermined national security.

"We’ve actually had tremendous intelligence failures because we’re monitoring the internet … everybody’s communications instead of suspects‘ communications. And that lack of focus has caused us to miss leads that we should have had," he said.

Questioning those policies is "improving our national security," Snowden said.

He called for stronger oversight of intelligence gathering and accused Congress of failing in that role.

"We have an oversight model that could work," Snowden said.

"The problem is when your overseers aren’t interested in oversight, when we’ve got Senate intelligence committees, House intelligence committees, that are cheerleading for the NSA instead of holding them to account."

ACLU privacy researcher Christopher Soghoian, who participated in the Snowden conference, noted that many Americans disagree with Snowden’s decision to leak classified information.

"Let me be clear about one really important thing: His disclosures have improved Internet security," Soghoian said, drawing applause from the crowd. "And the security improvements we’ve gotten haven’t just protected us from bulk government surveillance. They’ve protected us from hackers at Starbucks who are monitoring our wi-fi connections. They’ve protected us from stalkers and identity thieves and common criminals."

Wizner asked Snowden, who has been unable to leave Russia, if the impact of his revelations was worth the price he has paid. "Would I do this again? The answer is absolutely, yes," Snowden replied.

"Regardless of what happens to me, this is something we had a right to know. I took an oath to support and defend the Constitution, and I felt that the Constitution was violated on a massive scale."

Voice of Russia, dpa, Reuters

Fugitive intelligence leaker Edward Snowden voiced fears that US "government officials want to kill me", in a TV interview to be broadcast in Germany Sunday. The comment comes just days after Snowden’s Russian lawyer Anatoly Kucherena said the American feared for his life, following a report by US website BuzzFeed of explicit threats against him from unnamed Pentagon and National Security Agency (NSA) officials.

Snowden also told the German broadcaster: "These people, and they are government officials, have said they would love to put a bullet in my head or poison me when I come out of the supermarket, and then watch as I die in the shower."

The translated Snowden quotes were released by German public television chain ARD, as part of a longer interview shot secretly in Moscow.

In a BuzzFeed article posted online last week and entitled "American spies want Edward Snowden dead", a Pentagon official is quoted as saying: "I would love to put a bullet in his head."

"In a world where I would not be restricted from killing an American, I personally would go and kill him myself," a current NSA analyst was further quoted as saying.

One unnamed army officer told BuzzFeed that Snowden could be "poked" on his way home from buying groceries by a passerby who is actually a US agent.

Snowden "thinks nothing of it at the time (and soon) starts to feel a little woozy," the US intelligence officer is quoted as saying. "And the next thing you know he dies in the shower."

NSA carried out industrial intelligence for US – Snowden

The US National Security Agency (NSA) sometimes uses data it collects for economic purposes, intelligence leaker Edward Snowden reveals in an extract of an interview with a German television chain. "If there is information, for example on Siemens, which is in the national interest, but has nothing to do with national security, they will still use this information," said Snowden, according to the German translation of the interview on public television ARD.

The interview was carried out by a journalist for NDR, a regional chain belonging to the broadcaster that has analysed secret documents that Snowden leaked to journalists.

Under top secrecy, the chain this week in Moscow filmed the first interview with Snowden since he left Hong Kong in 2013 to seek refuge in Russia.

On its website, NDR said that Snowden assured he was no longer in possession of any confidential documents, as they had all been handed out to handpicked journalists.

The former NSA contractor said he no longer wants to, or is able to, take part in any future revelations.

Other than the consequences of his revelations about NSA surveillance programs, Snowden will also address "his personal path" to leaking the information.

On Thursday, in a question-and-answer session on the "Free Snowden" website, Snowden ruled out returning to the United States, where he said there was no chance of a free trial.

US Attorney General Eric Holder has said he was unlikely to consider clemency for Snowden.

Snowden won’t return to US without amnesty – legal adviser

Edward Snowden would be willing to enter talks with US Attorney General Eric Holder to negotiate his return to the United States but not without a guarantee of amnesty, his legal adviser said on Sunday.

Jesselyn Radack said she was glad Holder indicated last week he would talk to lawyers for the former US spy agency contractor to negotiate his return from Moscow, but that Snowden would need better protection.

"It’s a little disheartening that he (Holder) seemed to take clemency and amnesty off the table, which are two of the negotiating points," said Radack, who was interviewed via satellite from Moscow by NBC’s "Meet the Press".

"But again, none of us have been contacted yet about restarting negotiations," the legal adviser said.

Holder said in an interview on MSNBC on Thursday the United States would not consider the idea of amnesty for Snowden "where we say, no harm, no foul".

Radack, who is the director of national security and human rights at the Government Accountability Project – a whistleblowers‘ organization – said Snowden has already suffered because his US passport revoked has been revoked.

"He has been punished quite a bit already and while we are glad to dialogue and negotiate, he is not going to come back and face an espionage prosecution," she said.

Snowden himself on Thursday discussed what conditions would be necessary if he were to return to theUnited States on a website called "Free Snowden".

"Returning to the US, I think, is the best resolution for the government, the public, and myself, but it’s unfortunately not possible in the face of current whistleblower protection laws, which through a failure in law did not cover national security contractors like myself," Snowden wrote.

Michael Chertoff, former secretary of homeland security under President George W. Bush, who appeared after Radack on "Meet the Press," said Snowden could get a fair trial if he returns to the country but was unlikely to be granted amnesty.

"If he decides he wants to tell the US government everything he stole he may be able to bargain for some kind of reduced sentence," he said, adding Snowden was potentially facing a life sentence, or 25-30 years in jail.

Chertoff added that the government has "done deals in the past with spies" – comparing Snowden toRobert Hanssen, a former FBI agent who spied for Soviet and Russian intelligence services from 1979 to 2001.

Radack said allegations Snowden was a spy were unsubstantiated and the result of a smear campaign by the government.

"Mr. Snowden publicly chatted with the US this week to deny being a spy but if people don’t want to take my word for it or Mr. Snowden’s word for it, you can ask the FBI, which decided and still believes he acted alone," she said.

First interview while in Russia: Snowden talks to German NDR – reports

Former employee of US special services Edward Snowden, who revealed thousands of secret documents, has given his first interview since coming to Russia, the website of the German TV company NDR says.

The site says that Snowden, in strict secrecy, talked with journalist Hubert Seipel.

During the interview, Snowden particularly, said that the US National Security Agency also engages in industrial espionage. If there is information about, for example, the Siemens company, which is not linked with issues of national security, NSA would also use it, Snowden said.

Edward Snowden also said that at present, he has no confidential documents on his hands. He has already handed everythinhg he posessed over to journalists.

The full version of Snowden’s interview will be broadcasted by the NDR TV channel on Sunday at 22:00 GMT.

In July 2013, Edward Snowden gave several secret materials concerning the NSA’s secret surveillance activities to reportets from The Washington Post and The Guardian newspapers. The NSA claims that up to 20,000 secret documents may have come into journalists‘ hands.

After handing over the papers, he flew to Hong Kong. From July 23, 2013, Snowden stayed in the transit zone at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport until August when the Russian government granted him temporary asylum for one year.

Read more:

Republicans urge lawmakers to end surveillance of Americans‘ phone records

Snowden himself to decide on temporary asylum extension in Russia – lawyer

US gov’t abuse of human rights is the real crime, not Snowden – interview

Voice of Russia, RIA Novosti, Reuters, dpa

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